Dear future GED students

Dear future GED students

 

Dear future GED students,

 

        What you should expect if you choose to pursue your GED? First of all, the technical term for GED is General Educational Diploma, but the “G” also stands for Good, Great and Glorious.  

        When you first enter your GED class, be prepared to fit in. Every person there is there because they didn’t finish high school. Someone else’s story will be very similar to yours; you are not alone! The GED class is similar to high school because you are once again in a classroom, sitting at a desk contemplating your future dreams. No matter how young or old you are, your dreams may change form but they never disappear. The class is also very different because this time you are there by choice. This time you are driven, motivated and determined to succeed through knowledge. This time the roaring voice of fear isn’t quite as scary or loud.         

        Many people pursue their GED but not everyone succeeds at graduating. It takes a lot of wisdom and courage to follow through. Every student must show up and be there for themselves and not for anyone else. You must be responsible and honest with yourself. What are the goals that you’re setting for yourself and are you doing everything you can to meet them? Ultimately, this is your life, your future and your dreams. Most GED students were unable to graduate high school because, in some way, life’s obstacles prevented them from finishing. As we grow and learn, we know that life will always have obstacles and that it’s not so much about avoiding them as it is finding out how to go around them. Choosing to get your GED is an amazing opportunity to better your future, you just have to make the choice to claim it.  

        When I first walked into my GED class, I was physically petrified. I was more concerned about others opinions than myself. I also thought naively that it wouldn’t be as hard as it is. I wish when I started that I hadn’t let fear control my judgement. I wish I didn’t compare myself or my intellect to others, for we are all differently and uniquely made with a purpose. I wish I knew that failing was also succeeding as long as we never give up!

        If I could leave you with one thing, it would be that, you are already a success the minute you choose to finish your education. Never give up on your dreams! This is your journey, you have already planted the seed of knowledge, you just have to water it.

 

                                                                                                   Jennifer Lee Trisdale

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And the Winners are…….

And the Winners are…….

Drum roll, please…

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The votes have been tallied in the Spring 2018 YC Adult Education Writing Contest, An American Journal, and the results are in! All the semi-finalists had a slew of votes, but three pulled ahead to lead the pack.

In third place…. From the Diary of Elvis Presley by Delaney McIntosh

Thank you, thank you very much. 

In second place… From the Diary of Big Nose Kate by Jennifer Trisdale

How’s that for a “soiled dove”?!
And, with the most votes, in first place…
… Congratulations to Crystal Lopez for her entry From the Diary of Jackie Robinson, winner of a GED scholarship!

Spring 2018 Writing Contest

Spring 2018 Writing Contest

It’s time to vote for the winner in Yavapai College Adult Education’s annual spring writing contest! This year’s theme was “An American Journal”

Students were asked to write a fictional journal entry or letter from the perspective of an American historical figure of their choice.

We’ve had so many great entries, it’s been a real challenge to narrow it down to these finalists from each participating class.

We hope that you’ll read each entry and show our students your support by giving a “like” to the ones you enjoy! Every “like” counts as a vote in favor of that entry.

Disclaimer: This journal entry is a work of fiction based on a true event. It was written by an adult education student who researched the life of this American hero and put themselves in their shoes in order to help bring history to life.

The grand prize winner will receive a full GED scholarship!

 

A Letter From Nat Turner

A Letter From Nat Turner

November 30th, 1831

My Dearest Chary,

I am so sorry for everything I have put you through. All I wanted was to live a full, free life with you. But I can’t sit around knowing that when I’m gone my son and his family will have to go through the exact same thing. Someone had to do something. Maybe I didn’t go about it the way I should have but what option are we given? I will be executed but the memory of me will remain, my family will remain. I know you will teach or son the right from wrong I have so much faith in you. Our kids and our kids kids are our only hope. Black and white men are equal. We are all human beings that should have equal rights. God sent me a sign, I am here for a reason, my life would be worthless if I didn’t start the Rebellion. I hope you can forgive me, for leaving you behind. You have a reason for being here as well to teach right from wrong. To stand up for yourself and our son and me. I was born into slavery, I’m hoping with what I’ve done our sons son won’t be, he can be a free man and live a long health life with his family. Anyways my love the fight is over for now. I am hiding but will be found soon and hung for standing up for my rights. It smells like freedom where I am now, and is so cold I just wish I could hold you. Well my dear I hope you remember me as being loving husband, father and a man who won’t give up on what he believes in . I love you so much and wish you all the happiness in the world.

Xoxox –Nat Turner

 

Written by A. Hough
Disclaimer: This journal entry is a work of fiction based on a true event. It was written by an adult education student who researched the life of this American hero and put themselves in their shoes in order to help bring history to life.
Image Credit: This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923.

From the Diary of Big Nose Kate

From the Diary of Big Nose Kate

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Written by: J. Trisdale
Disclaimer: This journal entry is a work of fiction based on a true event. It was written by an adult education student who researched the life of this American hero and put themselves in their shoes in order to help bring history to life.
Image Credit: This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See this page for further explanation.

From the Diary of John F. Kennedy

From the Diary of John F. Kennedy

WWII- 1945

While flying over Germany, the small towns and fields looked peaceful, but in the larger cities like Frankfurt the buildings are merely piles of sod. All the centers of the big cities are of the same ash grey color from the air- the color of churned up and powdered stone and brick. Railroad centers are badly hit, but the harvest seems to be reasonably good and the fields appear as though they were being worked fully. The smell of burning wood and buildings burned my nose. Walking through the village, we tried to be as quiet as possible through our coughing from the smoke. As I looked around, I held my gun so tightly, my knuckles turned white. I was so afraid of being ambushed, my mouth was dry enough to spin cotton. We eventually made it through the small village into the forest. We took out our food and began to go over our instructions. We were starving, having not eaten in 2 days. The food wasn’t the best, but we were too hungry to care. I thought about how it was back home. I missed my family and friends. Knowing the war would be over soon, I couldn’t wait to get back home to eat a hot, refreshing meal. 

Written by: L Wright
Disclaimer: This journal entry is a work of fiction based on a true event. It was written by an adult education student who researched the life of this American hero and put themselves in their shoes in order to help bring history to life.
Image Credit: This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

From the Diary of Abigail Adams

From the Diary of Abigail Adams
April 5th, 1798
It is happening still, as I am sure it always shall from now until the end of my Dear
Husband’s time as our Nation’s Leader, these nasty whispers by people hiding behind closed doors, staunch in their disgust with a woman’s audacity to claim intelligence but too fearful to publicly speak ill against the President’s wife. While I may detest the men standing outside buildings and shouting their slurs to whomever will listen, calling me ‘Mrs. President’ in their vain attempts to undermine John’s efforts to maintain peace within our young democracy, I can at least respect their courage to do so in the light of day! Oh, but how can I respect these cowards, whom claim to be Men of Great Honor, but are unable to confront their President with their concerns about his affinity to seek my counsel with matters they deem ‘Men’s business’? I’ve written to John many times about the behavior of these men, whom I now see as both friend and foe, and his eyes most surely cross when he opens another letter that leaves little doubt about my views on the handling of the women in our society; but how can I not point out the two-facedness presently stalking all branches of our government, leaving half the people of its republic unaccounted for? To believe you hold more power or importance because you were born a Son of Adam is the type of thinking that will lead to the “rebellion of women, whom feel trapped by the bounds of laws in which they have no voice, or representation” *.
 
I can only hope that I may live to see the day that the women are not oppressed by the ideas of men, and that a woman’s intelligence may not be used as a means of shame for her partner. However, “I am more and more convinced that man is a dangerous creature and that power, whether vested in many or a few, is ever grasping, and like the grave, cries, ‘Give, give.’” * leaving me to fear that, no matter the amount of trust my husband has in my opinion, or the weight his voice may carry among our people, I will never be considered worthy of serious acknowledgment in the eyes of these American men. I do pray I am wrong.
 
Written by: T. Good
*Quotes from letters Abagail wrote to John, published in the book: “My Dearest Friend”
Disclaimer: This journal entry is a work of fiction based on a true event. It was written by an adult education student who researched the life of this American hero and put themselves in their shoes in order to help bring history to life.
Image Credit: This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 100 years or less. This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923.